Kosmos

Kosmos

Mar 11, 2008

Pencil on paper. Plots of the brightest points in the night sky. The computer takes photographs of the night sky and examines each pixel for its luminance level. It then joins the brightest points to make asterisms which it sends out to the plotter.

Voice

Voice

Apr 14, 2007

In the initial analysis phase Voice examines English texts and calculates the overall probability of each phonetic being spoken. It also analyses – for each phonetic – which of the other phonetics are more likely to precede and follow it.

In the articulation phase – during exhibitions – it applies the overall probability table to bias a random generator and constructs a seed sentence. It speaks this sentence through a bank of 44 speakers. Each speaker being associated with one particular phonetic.

Using the proximity probability tables, it then rearranges the phonetics in that sentence into more comfortable positions. It speaks the sentence again. It does this until it gets bored and then generates a completely new seed sentence.

My thanks to Ania Babiek for her voice.

Lost in Space

Lost in Space

Apr 14, 2005

4 tape recorders. Each machine plays a single word of Robby the robot’s catchphrase – that does not compute – from the Sci-Fi series Lost in Space. The pauses between each repetition are regular but different for each word, causing the words to fall in and out of sync.

The Eye of God

The Eye of God

Feb 14, 2005

Computer program and wide-screen monitor. Left to itself for a very long but finite period, the screen would generate every possible image at increasingly better resolution. Photographs from every dream and nightmare, from all pasts and futures – actual, possible and inconceivable.

The whole screen starts as one pixel. The program goes through all possible combinations of RGB for this single pixel. That is to say, every combination of the 256 reds, 256 greens and 256 blues that can make up a pixel. It then splits the screen horizontally and vertically, and combines each pixel with every other pixel on the screen in all possible configurations – and in all of each pixels own possible RGB combinations. The program keeps splitting the screen until it reaches the size of an actual pixel.

Chorus

Chorus

May 14, 2004

Computer controlled sound object. 3 announcement speakers attached to ceiling. Chorus continuously reinterprets and sings through the structure of the first passage of St.John’s Gospel.

Using the phonetic structure of that text as a template, the computer assigns a random consonant to each consonant position, and a random vowel to each vowel position. Spaces between words and at the end of sentences are preserved. Assigning each of the three speakers a separate channel and a separate note – F, C# and G – the computer then sings it’s new construction of consonants and vowels. After which it then loops back to generate another interpretation through the same template. The process is continuous and endless.

My thanks to the soprano, Lucetta Johnson.

Everything

Everything

Feb 12, 2004

Computer program and terminal. Left to itself for an infinity the script would say everything. Everything that has been said. Everything that will be said. Everything that could possibly be said.

Scrolling up the screen of the monitor is the output from a Perl script. This script works its way through the English alphabet, combining each letter with every other letter in all possible ways. In addition it runs spaces through each combination. This composes all the possible words in that combination, and consequently all it’s possible sentences. The program is open-ended. Working up from single letters it lengthens the sentence one letter at a time

The Monolith

The Monolith

Feb 7, 2003

Computer downloads random audio streams from internet. It then applies a speech recognition engine to transcribe those streams into English text – regardless of source language type.

Concurrently it constructs a voice by cutting up the audio streams themselves into individual phonetic sounds which it sorts into folders.

It then speaks it’s English text by pasting together sound files randomly drawn from the appropriate folders. As soon as a phonetic file is used it is erased.

The whole process is continuous and endless.